Message from the Co-Chairs and Executive Director


Nicole Chammartin
Co-Chair and Executive Director, Klinic Community Health and Sexuality Education Resource Centre (Winnipeg, MB)


Irene Clarence
Co-Chair and Executive Director, Mid-Main Community Health Centre (Vancouver, BC)


Scott Wolfe
Executive Director (Toronto, ON)

We are excited to share some reflections from 2016-17, the fifth operating year for the Canadian Association of Community Health Centres.

Following a very outward looking year in 2015-16 during which we focused our attention on the 2015 federal election and our shared health and social priorities for Canadians, this past year was one to look back inward; to build our processes, our structures and our knowledge-base as a pan-Canadian Community Health Centres movement.

Of course, we continued this year to advocate important health and social issues that affect individuals, families and communities across Canada. However, our attention shifted somewhat toward ensuring that our movement is truly grounded in all regions of the country, and that we have the shared tools and structures to move forward as a coherent national movement with strong provincial/territorial roots. Given the wide variation in policy and funding for CHCs across Canada and the federal/provincial nature of our health and social services systems, having stability and capacity at both federal and provincial levels is essential to the success of our future work together.

As you read through our annual report and consider core achievements from 2016-17, we hope you will join in celebrating an important year of building — one that will make great things possible in years to come.

We’re also pleased to report that we further stabilized the financial position of the association this year, achieving our third consecutive balanced budget and reaching the operating reserve goal set by the Board of Directors in 2012.

We hope you enjoy our highlights from a very important year and we thank our members for continuing to build our shared association, and for your true leadership.

 

Growing and Diversifying our CHC Membership

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17


0
Members
0
Members
0
Members
0
Members
0
Members

% of Members - Ontario
83%
% of Members - Rest of Canada
17%
% of Members - Ontario
76%
% of Members - Rest of Canada
24%
% of Members - Ontario
69%
% of Members - Rest of Canada
31%
% of Members - Ontario
67%
% of Members - Rest of Canada
33%
% of Members - Ontario
58%
% of Members - Rest of Canada
42%

 

It is fair to say that when CACHC was first launched in 2012, investment in Community Health Centres and networking among CHCs had slowed or stalled in all parts of Canada except for Ontario. This phenomenon was clearly reflected in the association’s founding membership in 2012-13, which was very heavily based in Ontario (83% of all members).

We’re very encouraged that over the course of five years this has gradually shifted and our membership and the Canadian CHCs movement now reflect a broad geographic base in regions across the country. Over the course of our first five years we have worked hard to re-engage CHCs across Canada, building a shared pan-Canadian vision which also accommodates and reflects differing needs and priorities in various regions of the country.

We have seen CHCs come together and unite again in many provinces, and we have seen the establishment of new CHCs and new provincial CHC associations. In 2016-17 we yet again achieved new heights together. 

 

Building Public Awareness, Telling the CHC Story

2016 CHCs Survey

In 2016, CACHC conducted its second Canada-wide survey of Community Health Centres. Adding further to important findings from the 2013 Canadian CHCs Survey, the 2016 survey confirmed many important details regarding the multi-sector health and social services delivered by CHCs across Canada and their impact at federal and provincial levels. 

CHC Definition

In 2016, CACHC’s Board of Directors led the development of a renewed Canada-wide definition of “Community Health Centre”. The definition, which is comprised of five core domains, was ratified by CHCs from across Canada at the 2016 CACHC AGM in Winnipeg. It will play a vital role in helping increase understanding of CHCs across provinces and territories.

CHCs Work!

CACHC also launched its new evidence-informed online series: CHCs Work! Articles demonstrate CHCs’ impact in improving health and social services across Canada, and are aligned with the 5 domains of the CHC definition/model. The series helps the public and policymakers better understand the value of CHCs’ multi-sector, community-centred approach.

CHC Perspectives

CACHC’s blog series CHC Perspectives brings stories and insights from staff and board members of CHCs across the country. The series helps put a personal face to the work of CHCs across Canada through client impact stories, insights on health advocacy, and reflections on practice experiences from diverse health and social service professionals working at CHCs.

Advocating a Healthier Society, Underscoring the Federal Role


363 MPs and all federal Cabinet Ministers received copies of the 2016 Canadian Community Health Centres Survey
“Bridging the Gap” campaign launched with federal government and all provincial / territorial governments

Advocated with Ministry of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship on key issues affecting refugees

Advocated with federal government for expedited federal approval of new supervised injection sites across Canada

Continued to advocate with federal government for establishment of national Pharmacare program
Continued to advocate for federal government investment in a national housing and homelessness-reduction strategy


 
Visit CACHC’s Action Centre to learn more 
 

Increasing Member Benefits and Opportunities

Efforts led by CACHC’s Board of Directors and Ad Hoc Member Services Working Group throughout 2016-17 resulted in development of a new direct member benefits strategy and launch of CACHC’s new Value in Purchasing (VIP) Program in time for April 1, 2017.

The CACHC webinar series grew further throughout 2016-17, delivering members with a wider range of information and education sessions. All webinars are archived online, providing an ongoing training and resource library for members as part of our evolving Knowledge and Networking Hub. 

Together, CACHC and our provincial partner, the Manitoba Association of Community Health (MACH), hosted CHC leaders from across Canada at the 2016 CACHC / MACH Joint AGMs, in Winnipeg. The two-day summit also celebrated the 90th anniversary of Canada’s first CHC, founded in Winnipeg in 1926.

Building the Foundation for a Stronger Pan-Canadian Movement

 

The success of our collective vision and goals as Community Health Centres across Canada depends upon our ability to operate federally, provincially and locally. In 2016-17, CACHC diverted some of its attention and capacity from federal activities to support the establishment and growth on local and provincial CHC networks and associations in many regions of the country. This essential role for CACHC is an investment in our longer-term, collective capacity to advance our vision and to successfully advocate positive social change with various levels of government.

 

ESDRAS NGENZI
Directeur général
ACFA Régionale de Calgary (Calgary, AB)



“As the newest French-language Community Health Centre in Canada and in a province with very few other CHCs, it has been essential to have CACHC as a lifeline to connect us with CHCs in other parts of the country. CACHC’s strategic and coordination support has also been very important in helping Alberta’s CHCs to develop our own provincial association and a vision for expanding access to CHCs throughout our province, including for other Francophone communities that need access to French-language services.”

BERNADETTE MACDONALD
Executive Director
Tri County Women’s Centre (Yarmouth, NS)
Board Member, NSACHC



“There is tremendous potential to improve health in Nova Scotia through Community Health Centres, but the small number of existing CHCs and our lack of provincial funding makes it very challenging for us to lead this work on our own. The strategic support and coordination capacity provided by CACHC has been essential to establishing our new Nova Scotia Association of Community Health Centres and launching a collective plan of action for Community Health Centres in Nova Scotia.”

GREY SHOWLER
Director of Health and Support Services
Victoria Cool Aid Society (Victoria, BC)
President, BCACHC



“CHCs in British Columbia established our new British Columbia Association of Community Health Centres (BCACHC) in 2016-17 through CACHC’s leadership. The BCACHC is growing and we’re on our way to becoming self-directing, but it would have been impossible to reach this point without CACHC’s coordination and support. Timing was critical as we were able to get our feet planted in time to have a major impact during the recent provincial election.”

MICHAEL PAYNE
Executive Director
Nine Circles CHC (Winnipeg, MB)
Chairperson, MACH



“CACHC was instrumental in bringing together Manitoba CHCs to relaunch the Manitoba Association of Community Health (MACH). It was an honour for us to showcase MACH’s development and activities when we hosted CHCs from across Canada at the 2016 CACHC AGM in Winnipeg. Moving forward, it’s very encouraging to know we’re building a strong presence for CHCs through CACHC and a growing number of provincial associations.”

 

Visit and learn more about our growing network of provincial Community Health Centre association partners

 

Strengthening Our Financial Position for Tomorrow

-$44,285

2012-13

2012-13

Our first year of operations, with a budgeted deficit

-$62,224

2013-14

2013-14

Our second year of operations, with another budgeted deficit

$52,027

2014-15

2014-15

Our third year of operations, achieving our goal of a surplus

$17,244

2015-16

2015-16

Our fourth year of operations, and second consecutive surplus

$25,595

2016-17

2016-17

Our fifth year of operations, and third consecutive surplus

 

Following two start-up years with operating deficits approved by the Board of Directors, our association has now achieved three consecutive surpluses. These planned surpluses have been part of the CACHC Board’s commitment to sound financial stewardship including a goal of achieving an operating reserve of $70,000 by 2017-18 in order to insure against future financial instability. As of March 31, 2017 CACHC has successfully achieved that target.

While the association continues to operate on a very limited operating budget, the need to operate within these tight parameters has forced the association to work creatively and to find efficiencies and economies of scale in its daily operations. 

CACHC operates on a principle of financial transparency through our Board of Directors and members. Our 2016-17 Financial Statements are available in the package of materials for our September 25, 2017 AGM in Calgary.